1. 3 Minutes Research
  2. Research proposal, ongoing research, completed research (thesis)
  3. Video format (MP3, MP4)
  4. No slide
  5. Duration 3 minutes
  6. Provide caption (optional)
  7. Background: One spot of your institution
  8. 100 MB
  9. Participants retains the copyright
  10. Consent form for publication (YouTube, Social Media, etc.)
  11. Link to upload Video file: ic3mp@poltekkesdepkes-sby.ac.id
  12. Contact Person: Yohanes Windi (WA +62 8113475137)
International Competition

10 thoughts on “International Competition

  • 22 October 2020 at 12:26 am
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    I would like to ask the complete mechanics of the said competition. I’m quite confused with the consent form and participants copy. Am interested to join. Thank you

    Reply
    • 2 November 2020 at 1:54 am
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      The participant becomes the holder of the copyright. The committee will ask permission to the participant to publish their videos. The participants then should complete the consent form to allow committee to publish their videos. The form will be provided later

      Reply
  • 23 October 2020 at 6:09 am
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    thank You Mr… it Good Competition for student and Lecture

    Reply
  • 4 November 2020 at 3:45 am
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    Hi! Can I ask further about the “no slide” mechanics. The video should be just the person talking?

    Thank you

    Reply
  • 11 November 2020 at 9:09 am
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    1. Any administration later for us if we join this copmtetion like working letter ?
    2. When i upload video in media social what sentences that i could take, like in poster?

    Reply
    • 12 November 2020 at 4:47 am
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      If we publish your video in social media we will ask your written permission (consent)

      Reply
  • 15 November 2020 at 3:58 pm
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    Primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and diabetes in Mongolia: The role of primary care

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  • 15 November 2020 at 4:06 pm
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    This thesis examines three domains to address the noncommunicable disease (NCD) burden in Mongolia – Prevalence, Policy and Practice. In Mongolia, since 2000 cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the leading cause of population mortality. The aim of this PhD study is to strengthen the NCD prevention and control policy and practice by exploring the prevalence trends of overweight and obesity in Mongolian adults, the government responses to the burden of NCDs and implementing the clinical guidelines in the primary care setting to reduce commonly occurring NCDs.
    A combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to address the aims of this PhD was used. The studies estimating the PREVALENCE of obesity among Mongolian adults provided trends and dynamics in the obesity prevalence over time using international and Asian-specific BMI cut-off points. Under the prevalence, two studies were conducted: the first focused on analysing trends in the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Mongolian adults during the past decade; and the second examined whether increases in waist circumference (WC) were greater than expected from changes in weight in Mongolian adults. The findings of the first study indicate that the age standardised prevalence of overweight and obese individuals increased from 36.9% to 53.3% for men and from 52.3% to 63.3% for women between 2005 and 2013. The age-standardised prevalence of obesity in men and women across all time points defined by the Asian-specific BMI cut-off points was approximately 1.5-2 times that of the international BMI cut-off points. Therefore, the studies demonstrated evidence of significant increases in the prevalence of overweight and obesity for Mongolian adults between 2005 and 2013.
    The analysis of POLICY involved reviewing NCD-related policy documents (n=45) in Mongolia. The policies were analysed against the objectives and recommended actions of the WHO 2008-2013 NCD Action Plan. The findings of the POLICY review demonstrate that the importance of a timely and coordinated response to the emerging burden of NCDs appears to be well recognised by Mongolia’s government. The main characteristics of government responses were a top-down and population health-based approach paralleled with health systems strengthening and emphasis on primary health care. However, the study revealed some areas for further improvement such as developing strategies to address chronic respiratory disease, promoting physical activity, educating the public with diet guidelines, introducing better regulation of food and beverage marketing especially to children and enhancing targeted NCD research funding.
    Under the practice, two studies were conducted: first focused on analysing enablers and barriers in the implementation of the clinical guidelines on hypertension and diabetes in urban Mongolia. The studies on implementation PRACTICE involved semi-structured interviews (n=30). The interviews were conducted across ten family health centres (FHCs) chosen from a list of all the FHCs (n = 136) located in urban Mongolia with primary care nurses (n = 20), practice doctors (n = 10) and practice managers (n = 10). In the first study, data was analysed using a thematic approach utilising the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF). This exploration of the implementation of the clinical guidelines on hypertension and diabetes identified several core drivers for the successful implementation, in particular, continuing medical education, face-to-face instruction, monitoring and feedback, supply and resource and ongoing support. In contrast, the study also identified the following problems, such as time constraints, demands from other competing tasks and increased workload that prevent the primary care providers from adhering to the guidelines’ recommendation. Therefore, we conclude that comprehensive investment in distribution and implementation strategies is essential for successful implementation of the guidelines.
    This PhD project creates a valuable contribution to addressing the three P’s holistically, namely prevalence or problem, policy and practice in the concerted efforts of NCD prevention and control in Mongolia and advancing the evidence base in the field of NCDs that has been increasing dramatically in the world.

    Reply
    • 20 November 2020 at 6:23 am
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      Yes. The topic matches the competition criteria. We’re waiting for your video

      Reply

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